If you thought America’s drinking water problems started and ended in Flint, Michigan, think again. From big cities and suburbs to the rural heartland, chemicals linked to cancer, heart disease, obesity, birth defects, and lowered IQ routinely spill from our taps, says NYT Best-selling author Seth M. Siegel.

====REGISTER TO  JOIN NYT BEST-SELLING AUTHOR SETH M SIEGEL ====

More than 800 have registered to hear Seth M. Siegel discuss Troubled Water.

To reserve your seat, register by today for 2 p.m. ET Tuesday, Sept. 22, Webinar: https://www.workcast.com/register?cpak=1448147292306883

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The nation’s water infrastructure and distribution system – conceived and built more than 100 years ago – is ill-equipped to safeguard against the rising number of contaminants threatening public health, notes Siegel. Still, the cost and disruption related to fixing drinking water infrastructure makes such repairs challenging to schedule and economically unfeasible for many cities. The result is a full third of our nation’s water consumers have turned to bottled water, consuming more than 70B drinking water containers a year.

This is a significant tragedy when you consider water is infinitely recyclable, and there is more water in the atmosphere than in all the rivers on the planet.

Join us for a compelling look at the water we drink through the eyes of those leading the research and innovation.  

Key Take-aways:  

  • Extreme weather events, crumbling infrastructure and emerging contaminants are impacting water quality and placing new demands on our utilities and water systems.
  • New ideas are needed and are being introduced, spanning standards to tests and new treatment and delivery methods.
  • New, mobile treatment technologies and atmospheric water offer an exciting new frontier, completely separate from existing infrastructure, potentially modeling the innovation with solar energy. 

GlobalWaterWorks is working with Scranton Gillette Communications (publishers of www.WQPMag.comwww.eStormwater.com and  www.WWDMag.com) to support this three part-webinar series, which will start with Seth M. Siegel and utility innovation leader, Melissa Meeker, and commercial water investor, Mike Reardon.

The above sponsors are addressing various aspects of water security, innovation, provision and protection. We encourage you to check out their Web sites for more details:

Again, this is the first in a three-part series.  Session #2 and #3 will focus upon:

  • Evolution of Atmospheric Water and New Standards. 2 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Oct. 20 
  • Atmospheric Water Innovators and Applications, 2 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Nov. 17 

Next Steps:

There’s still time to register (and get professional development credits and access to “on-demand” recording). You can share this link with others you know: http://bit.ly/SGC-Sep22.

If you have questions or ideas for water quality management, we invite you to share them in comments below or in the GlobalWaterWorks Water Quality Management group: http://bit.ly/GWWQuality, hosted by Rick Bacon of Aqua Metrology Systems